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The decline of meth and the rise of phenyl-2-propanone (P2P)

In News by Jake Docker

“I don’t know that I would even call it meth anymore…” – Joe Bozenko, DEA Chemist & Professor, Shephard University.Methamphetamine is arguably the most demonised, stigmatised and generally misconceived drug in global circulation. Within the Australian context, we have all seen the confronting, graphic and gratuitously violent imagery of anti-ice advertisements, depicting ‘ice’ users in diabolical fits of rage lashing …

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Drugs in sport: dissecting the untold harms of stigmatisation.

In News by Jake Docker

Aussies love their stimulants nearly as much as sports! We punch well above our weight on the international level. On the world stage, we just miss out on a podium finish for our average total stimulant consumption, securing 4th place at 59 doses per 1,000 people per day [following Czechia (76 doses), the United States of America (USA; 74 doses), …

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International Overdose Awareness Day – 2022

In News by Jake Docker

International Overdose awareness day was initiated in 2001, August 31 will mark 21 years of the world’s largest annual campaign to end overdose and remember without stigma those who have died, acknowledging the grief of all those impacted by overdose, whose loved ones have died or suffered permanent injury.

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Introducing DULF

In News by Jake Docker

DULF is a collective made up of two drug users and activists fighting against the prevailing system that stigmatizes and kills drug users. They figuratively want to burn down the existing system, replacing it with a more caring and compassionate model. Their logo of flames encircled by flames suggests they want to be at the centre of something volatile and explosive.

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World Hepatitis Day- Message delivered by AIVL’s Ceo at Parliament house

In News by Jake Docker

AIVL and the important network of community-led organisations working in response to Blood Borne Viruses and sexually transmissible infections have, for decades utilised their limited resources to work in close partnership with each other. Not only have they been the voice of the community at a national level but have also been drivers for getting the community to both engage in healthcare and promote the uptake of harm reduction practices. We remain closely knit in our joint commitment to eliminate Hepatitis C by 2030.

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AIVL’s annual World Hepatitis Day Oration

In News by Jake Docker

Whenever there are highly desirable restricted products within society, there will be people willing to produce, and sell “knock-offs” of the products. It doesn’t matter if it is a Gucci handbag, concert tickets, or a pill. Within the drug using community, it is becoming more common for the “People’s Choice” of benzos (Xanax) to be mimicked and sold by “bootleggers.”

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International Drug Users Remembrance Day – 2022

In News by Jake Docker

21 July marks the date of International Drug Users Remembrance Day, a day observed by the International Network of People who use Drugs (INPUD) in conjunction with UNAIDS, to reflect upon the countless lives lost to drug related harm.

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Overdosing is Not a Crime! Neither is Harm Reduction Education and Information.

In News by Jake Docker

Whenever there are highly desirable restricted products within society, there will be people willing to produce, and sell “knock-offs” of the products. It doesn’t matter if it is a Gucci handbag, concert tickets, or a pill. Within the drug using community, it is becoming more common for the “People’s Choice” of benzos (Xanax) to be mimicked and sold by “bootleggers.”

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AIVL at ‘Support Don’t Punish: Is it time to legalise drugs?’

In News by Jake Docker

Last month AIVL Staff attended ‘Is it time to legalise drugs?’ a discussion by Drug Policy Australia on Friday June 24. Presentations by Dr Alex Wodak, Dr Annie Madden AO, The Honourable Michael Kirby, The Honourable Bob Carr, Greg Chipp and Emma Maiden covered topics of the harms of illicit drug criminalisation, drug law reform, and the need for drug policies to be viewed within a public health lens, stating that our current drug policies are not assessed on merit but rather cultural and societal ‘norms’, characterised by moralistic righteousness against the backdrop of maintaining diplomatic ties through the established rhetoric of prohibition politics.